CUBS WIN!!! CUBS WIN!!!

Diane Henrikson Russell

The moment I stepped off my Southwest Airlines plane at Midway Airport, I could feel the electricity in the air. It was Wednesday, November 2, 2016. Millions of Cubs fans, including me, were holding our collective breaths as we waited for the seventh game of the World Series between the Chicago Cubs and the Cleveland Indians. We were still nonplussed at finding ourselves in this sweet yet precarious position, thanks to the guiding hand of Coach Joe Maddon (who coincidentally coached the Tampa Bay Rays in the 2008 World Series). The Cubs had last won the World Series in 1908.

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To Tell the Truth — The Finale

Today’s bonus issue of OLLI Connects will test your evaluation skills with the final two entries in the To Tell The Truth contest. Have you been following along? If not, just scroll back to the beginning of November, read through the stories contributed by all the entrants, and add your assessment in the comments: were they telling a true story or simply spinning a yarn?  Next Thursday, on December 8th, another bonus issue will bring you the big reveal. The winner will claim bragging rights and a special prize created just for him or her. Today’s two stories are: Surprise by Jan Vaupel and Chenawah by Joan Weaving. Enjoy! — Editor
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To Tell the Truth Challenge — Episode 4

Well, we have arrived at Week 4 of the To Tell the Truth Contest. How are you doing so far? Do you think you have correctly sussed out truth from fiction?  Don’t forget to leave your True/False vote in the comment section below the authors’ biographies. After we compile all the responses, we will select the winner and announce his or her name and reveal the veracity of each of the ten entrants in December. Stay tuned for one more bonus episode this Thursday, but for now enjoy Marilyn Myerson’s The Haunting: Ghosts in my Life and Diane Henrikson Russel’s Pet Cards and To Tell the Truth. — Editor    Read more  

Becoming a Poker Player

Sheldon Busansky

I remember hurrying home from elementary school whenever my mother had her friends over for bridge and sitting by her side to watch them play. Later, occasionally I was allowed to play a few hands of pinochle with my father and uncles on Sunday night, and then in high school I visited a classmate and often played hearts with his father and twin sisters. Cards were for me what sports were for many of my friends.

When I entered college in 1951, I decided to focus on bridge and often played in tournaments and at the local bridge club. I eventually became friendly with an exceptional bridge player, and we frequently partnered in a Friday-night cash game at the club. My only involvement with poker was an occasional afternoon penny ante game with some dormitory friends. I usually was a winner and my friend Marty always lost.  (More…)

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